Latest Events

Donate to SCND

Amount to donate:
£  GBP  






ScrapTrident


News

Select a news topic from the list below, then select a news article to read.

US takes over Aldermaston

and plans a new bomb assembly factory and plans a new bomb assembly factory

Image

On Friday 19 December, the day after the House of Commons closed for Christmas, it was announced that US companies now control two thirds of AWE Management Ltd, the company that runs the Atomic Weapons Establishment. One third of the company had been in the hands of Government-controlled BNFL. However this share has just been sold to the US company Jacobs Engineering.

Report 2 from NPT

While the delegates and non-government organisations at the Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference are grappling with issues that concern the very future of our planet, the US media were obsessing about a failed car bomb in Times Square.

Barth Eide and SNP NATO debate

 

Angus Robertson has highlighted a recent meeting with Espen Barth Eide, the Norwegian Foreign Minister. The implication is that Barth Eide supports Robertson's proposal that an independent Scotland should be in NATO. The capital city which is most likely to want to see Scotland in NATO is not Oslo, but Washington. It is therefore interesting to note that Barth Eide has been criticised for being too close to America.

Motion lodged in the Scottish Parliament - French Nuclear Missile Test Failure

                                                                                             Yesterday the French Navy tested a strategic missile of the new generation M51 (launched from the submarine "Le Triomphant"). The test was a failure and the missile was destroyed briefly after its launch.  

http://tinyurl.com/French-Nuclear-Missile-Failure

In response, Bill Kidd MSP lodged a motion in the Scottish Parliament.

 

Keith Bovey RIP

We are sorry to hear of the death of  Bovey formerly a senior activist in Scottish CND. Keith made a very significant to Scottish CND and the wider Scottish peace movement.
Our thoughts are with his family at this sad time.
Funeral Arrangements:
 
Private family committal service at Corstorphine Hill Cemetery, followed by a funeral service on Monday, June 26, at the Braid Hills Hotel, Edinburgh EH10 6JD commencing at 11.30 am, to which all family and friends are respectfully invited.

Motion supporting Defence Diversification passed at the TUC conference

Scottish CND have given a warm welcome to a motion passed at the TUC conference at Brighton this week.

The text of the motion is set out below .


Defence, jobs and diversification

Congress welcomes the ‘Lucas Plan’ 40th Anniversary Conference held in Birmingham in November 2016 and agrees that the Plan was an idea from which we can learn much today. 

The Plan was a pioneering effort by workers at arms company Lucas Aerospace to retain jobs by proposing alternative, socially useful applications of the company’s technology and their own skills. Forty years afterwards, we are facing a convergence of crises – militarism and nuclear weapons, climate chaos, and the destruction of jobs by automation – which mean that we have to start thinking about technology as political, as the Lucas Aerospace workers did.

However, in the four decades since the Plan was drawn up Britain’s manufacturing industry has shrunk from 25 per cent to 14 per cent of GDP, with the ‘defence’ industry now representing 10 per cent of all manufacturing. Britain cannot afford to lose any more manufacturing skills and capacity, and ‘defence’ workers are rightly concerned about the potential loss of jobs, for example if Trident replacement is cancelled. 

John Pilger's Guardian Article On Hiroshima

left

When I first went to Hiroshima in 1967, the shadow on the steps was still there. It was an almost perfect impression of a human being at ease: legs splayed, back bent, one hand by her side as she sat waiting for a bank to open. At a quarter past eight on the morning of August 6, 1945, she and her silhouette were burned into the granite. I stared at the shadow for an hour or more, then walked down to the river and met a man called Yukio, whose chest was still etched with the pattern of the shirt he was wearing when the atomic bomb was dropped.

He and his family still lived in a shack thrown up in the dust of an atomic desert. He described a huge flash over the city, "a bluish light, something like an electrical short", after which wind blew like a tornado and black rain fell. "I was thrown on the ground and noticed only the stalks of my flowers were left. Everything was still and quiet, and when I got up, there were people naked, not saying anything. Some of them had no skin or hair. I was certain I was dead." Nine years later, when I returned to look for him, he was dead from leukaemia.

In the immediate aftermath of the bomb, the allied occupation authorities banned all mention of radiation poisoning and insisted that people had been killed or injured only by the bomb's blast. It was the first big lie. "No radioactivity in Hiroshima ruin" said the front page of the New York Times, a classic of disinformation and journalistic abdication, which the Australian reporter Wilfred Burchett put right with his scoop of the century. "I write this as a warning to the world," reported Burchett in the Daily Express, having reached Hiroshima after a perilous journey, the first correspondent to dare. He described hospital wards filled with people with no visible injuries but who were dying from what he called "an atomic plague". For telling this truth, his press accreditation was withdrawn, he was pilloried and smeared - and vindicated.

Financial Crisis Will Hit Nuclear Power

Growth in the construction of new nuclear plants worldwide is at risk because of the global financial crisis, U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman has said. During a visit to Paris, Bodman said the crisis could have an impact on the "nuclear renaissance" that is sweeping the industry as countries around the globe search for alternatives to fossil fuels.

Long-term projects like nuclear plant building "are the ones that are going to be the most difficult to finance," he told reporters. While Bodman said he is hopeful the financial crisis will be resolved, "long term projects are at risk, I would think."

While long-term nuclear projects are at risk, short-term projects such as oil drilling shouldn't be affected, Bodman said, because the industry is less reliant on bank borrowing.

The Wartime Broadcasting Service

"This is the Wartime Broadcasting Service. This country has been attacked with nuclear weapons." In the normally prosaic world of public safety announcements, they were probably the two most chilling sentences ever recorded in readiness for release across Britain's airwaves.

 

But secret documents reveal for the first time the full text of the warning to be broadcast by the BBC in the event of a nuclear war, show that Whitehall was obsessed as much with the voice that would be used to announce Armageddon as it was with protecting what was left of the British population.

Senior civil servants in charge of drawing up the pre-recorded radio announcement became concerned that only a recognisable broadcaster should be used for fear that an unfamiliar voice would create the impression that Auntie had been "obliterated".

The quandary was deepened when it emerged that the only BBC employee to have been given the appropriate security clearance for the project was a relatively unknown retired newsreader called Hugh Searight. None of the BBC's star broadcasters � Angela Rippon, Michael Parkinson, Frank Bough or Richard Baker � were judged to have been checked to the required level. The apocalyptic tussle between the Beeb and three Whitehall departments in 1973 and 1974 is detailed in documents released at the National Archives in Kew, west London.

Letter from America

We had planned to write the obligatory column about the departure of George W. Bush from the White House, but you've heard all the shoe jokes by now. And we'll wait and see whether Barack Obama carries through on his promises to close Guantanamo, end the practices of warrantless wiretapping, torture and rendition, and begin the withdrawal of troops from Iraq and Afghanistan.