ICAN Scottish Partner

Latest Events

Donate to SCND

Amount to donate:
£  GBP  




ScrapTrident


Heritage Foundation\'s Views on U.S.-U.K. Relations After Blair

Most observers believe Brown won\'t diverge significantly from Blair\'s foreign policy, but it\'s likely that he\'ll edge left - toward the Labour Par ty\'s base - and away from positions that are now highly unpopular in Britain. That also means a move away from President Bush, who has worked well - and closely - with Blair. That may mean trouble ahead on a number of vital issues, including Iran, nuclear policy, and, even, NATO. What about Iraq? Brown played little apparent role in Blair\'s prewar decisionmaking - indeed, the British press reported that he was thoroughly marginalized. In the end, he publicly backed Blair on the war. But, having been sceptical from the outset, he\'s surely supportive of the recent, quiet British drawdown in southern Iraq to 7,800 troops -and, undoubtedly, beyond. Deterrence: In the next few years, Britain must decide whether to replace its Trident submarine-based nuclear deterrent. The current force of four \"boomers\" goes out of service in 2024. Brown will be under pressure from Labour\'s pacifist wing to disarm - a move that would symbolize, and hasten, the end of Britain\'s traditional, steadfast (and Yank-friendly) leadership in world affairs. NATO: This autumn\'s NATO summit in Riga, Latvia, will be a turning point for the alliance\'s future - especially its role outside Europe. The United States is broadly looking for NATO to do more. Brown, always tough on defense budgets and less interventionist, is likely to go slow on expanding NATO\'s role. Overall, Brown isn\'t likely to be a disaster for U.S. foreign policy - but an initial distancing from Washington is likely, both to keep the party base happy and to boost his poll numbers, where in some cases he\'s less popular than Blair. Nevertheless, if Brown gets the nod from his party (and historically that\'s no sure bet), he\'s unlikely to end the special relationship with the U.S. But under Brown, it\'s possible the relationship won\'t be so special after all.