ICAN Scottish Partner

Latest Events

Donate to SCND

Amount to donate:
£  GBP  




ScrapTrident


Scottish Parliament Rejects Nuclear Power

MSPs have voted by 63 to 58 to reject nuclear power, exactly a week after Gordon Brown, the Prime Minister, committed the UK government to a new generation of such stations.

The Holyrood vote was hailed by SNP ministers as signalling a clean, bright future for Scottish energy.

Jim Mather, the Energy Minister, said: "This vote transforms the terms of the energy debate in Scotland – we now have a Parliament and Government able and willing to take forward Scotland's clean, green energy future. Scotland's energy future is bright."

An alliance of the SNP, the Liberal Democrats and the Greens was enough to see the policy through, with the Tories and Labour voting to retain nuclear energy.

MSPs have voted by 63 to 58 to reject nuclear power, exactly a week after Gordon Brown, the Prime Minister, committed the UK government to a new generation of such stations.

The Holyrood vote was hailed by SNP ministers as signalling a clean, bright future for Scottish energy.

Jim Mather, the Energy Minister, said: "This vote transforms the terms of the energy debate in Scotland – we now have a Parliament and Government able and willing to take forward Scotland's clean, green energy future. Scotland's energy future is bright."

An alliance of the SNP, the Liberal Democrats and the Greens was enough to see the policy through, with the Tories and Labour voting to retain nuclear energy.

The vote will give the Scottish Government solid parliamentary backing for its opposition to nuclear power stations and will mean Scotland and England pursuing completely different paths in electricity generation for the foreseeable future. Energy policy is reserved to Westminster, but Holyrood has control over planning policy, so can veto any applications for new nuclear plants.

The First Minister said "virtually no country in Europe has the vast array of potential cheap, renewable, low carbon energy sources that Scotland has. The real task for our country is not just to secure our electricity production, which we will do and can do, the real task is to find the economic means of exporting that substantial surplus of power to the energy-poor areas of Europe. And that is what this Government has been addressing."

The Holyrood  vote was welcomed by environmental campaigners.

Duncan McLaren, the chief executive of Friends of the Earth Scotland, said: "We warmly welcome the Scottish Parliament's rejection of the expensive white elephant of nuclear power, and their recognition that new nuclear power stations would be practically useless in the fight against climate change."

He went on: "This vote confirms Friends of the Earth Scotland's earlier research, which found that a majority of Scotland's MSPs are opposed to new nuclear power stations in Scotland."