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Scientists Call On US To Reduce Nuclear Stockpile

A group of 95 scientists says the United States should significantly reduce the country's collection of nuclear weapons.

The 95 National Academy of Sciences members said  the current U.S. weapons stockpile was going against U.S. security. Most of the experts are from prominent U.S. universities and as a group have received 32 Nobel Prizes.

The group, coordinated by the Union of Concerned Scientists, suggested that the United States cut back its arms stockpile to 1,000 explosives, compared to the 4,500 to 6,000 it has now. It also reportedly requested that the country surrender first use of the nuclear explosives.

Richard Garwin, who made plans for the first hydrogen bomb, was one of the scientists to sign the proposal..

 

A group of 95 scientists says the United States should significantly reduce the country's collection of nuclear weapons.

The 95 National Academy of Sciences members said  the current U.S. weapons stockpile was going against U.S. security. Most of the experts are from prominent U.S. universities and as a group have received 32 Nobel Prizes.

The group, coordinated by the Union of Concerned Scientists, suggested that the United States cut back its arms stockpile to 1,000 explosives, compared to the 4,500 to 6,000 it has now. It also reportedly requested that the country surrender first use of the nuclear explosives.

Richard Garwin, who made plans for the first hydrogen bomb, was one of the scientists to sign the proposal..


"Without bold U.S. leadership, our country and the world will face a new and more dangerous era in which it is likely many more nations -- and possibly terrorists -- will possess nuclear weapons," said Kurt Gottfried, UCS co-founder, Board Chair, and Emeritus Professor of Physics at Cornell University. "The United States must lead by example and de-legitimize nuclear weapons as instruments of security policy and military power."

The statement includes several unilateral policy initiatives that would strengthen U.S. security by lowering the risk of nuclear proliferation, nuclear terrorism, or a Russian nuclear attack. These include declaring a no first-use policy; rejecting and replacing current "hair-trigger" rapid-launch options; ratifying the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty; reducing the U.S. nuclear arsenal to 1,000 warheads, including deployed and reserve warheads; committing the United States to reducing its number of nuclear weapons below 1,000 on a negotiated and verified bilateral or multilateral basis; and reaffirming the U.S. commitment to pursue nuclear disarmament as required under Article VI of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

"The steps outlined in this statement will make the United States and the world safer," said Steven Weinberg, a Nobel Laureate in physics and one of the signatories. "If pursued, these practical steps will provide credible U.S. leadership toward a world with fewer risks from existing nuclear arsenals and effective approaches to reducing the threats of nuclear proliferation and nuclear terrorism."